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Anne-Marie Slaughter - Unfinished Business : Women Men Work Family download EPUB, DOC, TXT

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A powerful, persuasive, thought-provoking vision for how to finish the long struggle for equality between men and women, work and family When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for "The Atlantic," Why Women Still Can t Have It All, created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine s history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the motherhood penalty, women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women s movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Advance praise for "Unfinished Business" Anne-Marie Slaughter insists that we ask ourselves hard questions. After reading "Unfinished Business, " I m confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie s hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job. Hillary Rodham Clinton Anne-Marie Slaughter s gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary for anyone who wants to be both a leader at work and a fully engaged parent at home. Arianna Huffington With breathtaking honesty Anne-Marie Slaughter tackles the challenges of often conflicted working mothers and working fathers and shows how we can craft the lives we want for our families. Her book will spark a national conversation about what we need to do to live saner, more satisfying lives. Katie Couric "Unfinished Business" is an important read for women and men alike. Slaughter shows us that when people share equally the responsibility of caring for others, they are healthier, economies prosper, and both women and men are freer to lead the lives they want. Melinda Gates Important. Revolutionary. "Unfinished Business" insists we recognize a simple truth: Human life requires space for caring for others during childhood, illness, infirmity, and everything in between.Anne-Marie Slaughter has written the instruction manual for our next cultural transformation. Atul Gawande", Anne-Marie Slaughter's Unfinished Business is a powerful, persuasive, and thought-provoking vision for how to finish the long struggle for equality between men and women, work and family., NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY "THE WASHINGTON POST"AND NPR An eye-opening call to action from someone who rethought the whole notion of having it all, "Unfinished Business" could change how many of us approach our most important business: living. "People" When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for "The Atlantic," Why Women Still Can t Have It All, created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine s history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the motherhood penalty, women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women s movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Praise for "Unfinished Business" Another clarion call from Slaughter . . . Her case for revaluing and better compensating caregiving is compelling. . . . Slaughter] makes it a point in her book to speak beyond the elite. Jill Abramson, "The Washington Post" Slaughter simportant contribution is to use her considerable platform to call for cultural change, itself profoundly necessary. . . . It should go right into the hands of (still mostly male) decision-makers. "Los Angeles Times" Slaughter should be applauded for devising a new vocabulary to identify a broad, misclassified social phenomenon. And she is razor-sharp on outlining the cultural shifts necessary to give caregiving its due. "The Economist" A meaningful correction to Sheryl Sandberg s "Lean In" . . . For Slaughter, it is organizations not women that need to change. "Slate" I m confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie s hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job. Hillary Rodham Clinton Slaughter s gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary. Arianna Huffington", NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST * "An eye-opening call to action from someone who rethought the whole notion of 'having it all,' Unfinished Business could change how many of us approach our most important business: living."-- People When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for The Atlantic , "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine's history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the "motherhood penalty," women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women's movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Praise for Unfinished Business "Another clarion call from Slaughter . . . Her case for revaluing and better compensating caregiving is compelling. . . . [Slaughter] makes it a point in her book to speak beyond the elite." --Jill Abramson, The Washington Post "Slaughter's important contribution is to use her considerable platform to call for cultural change, itself profoundly necessary. . . . It should go right into the hands of (still mostly male) decision-makers." -- Los Angeles Times "Slaughter should be applauded for devising a 'new vocabulary' to identify a broad, misclassified social phenomenon. And she is razor-sharp on outlining the cultural shifts necessary to give caregiving its due." -- The Economist "A meaningful correction to Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In . . . For Slaughter, it is organizations--not women--that need to change." -- Slate "I'm confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie's hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job." --Hillary Rodham Clinton "Slaughter's gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary." --Arianna Huffington, NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST AND NPR * "An eye-opening call to action from someone who rethought the whole notion of 'having it all,' Unfinished Business could change how many of us approach our most important business: living."-- People When Anne-Marie Slaughter accepted her dream job as the first female director of policy planning at the U.S. State Department in 2009, she was confident she could juggle the demands of her position in Washington, D.C., with the responsibilities of her family life in suburban New Jersey. Her husband and two young sons encouraged her to pursue the job; she had a tremendously supportive boss, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton; and she had been moving up on a high-profile career track since law school. But then life intervened. Parenting needs caused her to make a decision to leave the State Department and return to an academic career that gave her more time for her family. The reactions to her choice to leave Washington because of her kids led her to question the feminist narrative she grew up with. Her subsequent article for The Atlantic , "Why Women Still Can't Have It All," created a firestorm, sparked intense national debate, and became one of the most-read pieces in the magazine's history. Since that time, Anne-Marie Slaughter has pushed forward, breaking free of her long-standing assumptions about work, life, and family. Though many solutions have been proposed for how women can continue to break the glass ceiling or rise above the "motherhood penalty," women at the top and the bottom of the income scale are further and further apart. Now, in her refreshing and forthright voice, Anne-Marie Slaughter returns with her vision for what true equality between men and women really means, and how we can get there. She uncovers the missing piece of the puzzle, presenting a new focus that can reunite the women's movement and provide a common banner under which both men and women can advance and thrive. With moving personal stories, individual action plans, and a broad outline for change, Anne-Marie Slaughter reveals a future in which all of us can finally finish the business of equality for women and men, work and family. Praise for Unfinished Business "Another clarion call from Slaughter . . . Her case for revaluing and better compensating caregiving is compelling. . . . [Slaughter] makes it a point in her book to speak beyond the elite." --Jill Abramson, The Washington Post "Slaughter's important contribution is to use her considerable platform to call for cultural change, itself profoundly necessary. . . . It should go right into the hands of (still mostly male) decision-makers." -- Los Angeles Times "Slaughter should be applauded for devising a 'new vocabulary' to identify a broad, misclassified social phenomenon. And she is razor-sharp on outlining the cultural shifts necessary to give caregiving its due." -- The Economist "A meaningful correction to Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In . . . For Slaughter, it is organizations--not women--that need to change." -- Slate "I'm confident that you will be left with Anne-Marie's hope and optimism that we can change our points of view and policies so that both men and women can fully participate in their families and use their full talents on the job." --Hillary Rodham Clinton "Slaughter's gift for illuminating large issues through everyday human stories is what makes this book so necessary." --Arianna Huffington

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