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Read book Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa by William John Burchell PDF, DOC, FB2

9781108084956
English

1108084958
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1824 Excerpt: ...acacias. Some of its inhabitants were seen, but they did not approach us. They left the place a few weeks afterwards, and removed their kraal more within the boundaries of their own country; if so nice a distinction of territory can be made between these nations. The Bachapins and Bushmen are, in general, not on very good terms; but they are tolerated in each other's country, if they excite no suspicion of their being come there with the design of stealing cattle; for robbery of this kind is, between the various South-African nations, the only cause of warfare, whether as avowed plundering, or as pretended retaliation. Notwithstanding the whole days-journey being over sandy ground, the oxen stepped on for the greater part of the time at the rate of eighty-six revolutions of the wheel in five minutes, which, according to the table already mentioned as having been calculated for this purpose, indicated three miles and a hundred-and-thirty-eight yards in the hour: in the heaviest parts of the road, our rate was only eighty-one revolutions. From these data, combined with the time we were travelling, which was five hours and fifteen minutes, the length of this day's-journey may be stated with tolerable exactness, at fifteen miles and a quarter. Catal. Geogr. n. 2220. f Passerina? Catal. Geogr. 220S. 342 ON DISTANCES TRAVELLED.--SIKKLONIANI. 10 July, A traveller, therefore, who would adopt this method of ascertaining distances, would be careful to note down in his memorandum book, not only the number of revolutions at different times; but the times by his watch, when the waggon first moves on, and when it arrives at the station; besides keeping an account of the time lost by occasionally halting on the road. An apparatus of clock-work on the principle of the pera..., William John Burchell (1781 1863) is still admired for this outstanding two-volume geography of South Africa, published in 1822 4 and later taken on Darwin's Beagle voyage. It is based on his journal of the first year of a 4,500-mile expedition into southern Africa from 1811 to 1815, while 'botanist to the Cape Colony'. Volume 1 particularly focuses on landscapes, and flora and fauna, often giving their indigenous names, while Volume 2 is more ethnographical. Burchell emphasises at several points in his account that his observations are 'most impartial and unprejudiced', intended to present a true picture of southern Africa's 'Aboriginal Inhabitants'. He also claims that unlike many travelogues, his contains no 'indelicacies offensive to decency'. He returned to England with 500 scientific and ethnographical drawings, many of them used as illustrations in the book, and about 63,000 natural history specimens including 120 animal skins and 265 species of bird.", William John Burchell (1781-1863) is still admired for this outstanding two-volume geography of South Africa, published in 1822-4 and later taken on Darwin's Beagle voyage. It is based on his journal of the first year of a 4,500-mile expedition into southern Africa from 1811 to 1815, while 'botanist to the Cape Colony'. Volume 1 particularly focuses on landscapes, and flora and fauna, often giving their indigenous names, while Volume 2 is more ethnographical. Burchell emphasises at several points in his account that his observations are 'most impartial and unprejudiced', intended to present a true picture of southern Africa's 'Aboriginal Inhabitants'. He also claims that unlike many travelogues, his contains no 'indelicacies ... offensive to decency'. He returned to England with 500 scientific and ethnographical drawings, many of them used as illustrations in the book, and about 63,000 natural history specimens including 120 animal skins and 265 species of bird., William John Burchell (1781–1863) is still admired for this outstanding two-volume geography of South Africa, published in 1822–4 and later taken on Darwin's Beagle voyage. It is based on his journal of the first year of a 4,500-mile expedition into southern Africa from 1811 to 1815, while 'botanist to the Cape Colony'. Volume 1 particularly focuses on landscapes, and flora and fauna, often giving their indigenous names, while Volume 2 is more ethnographical. Burchell emphasises at several points in his account that his observations are 'most impartial and unprejudiced', intended to present a true picture of southern Africa's 'Aboriginal Inhabitants'. He also claims that unlike many travelogues, his contains no 'indelicacies 
 offensive to decency'. He returned to England with 500 scientific and ethnographical drawings, many of them used as illustrations in the book, and about 63,000 natural history specimens including 120 animal skins and 265 species of bird.

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